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Showing posts from February, 2016

Feting Fall Grads

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Congratulations to the Biograds who successfully completed their degrees during the fall quarter! We're sad to see them go but thrilled for their accomplishments!

Edith Pierre-Jerome
Tuning the auxin transcriptional response  Nemhauser Lab | September 18
Up Next: Edith is now a post doc with Benfey lab at Duke. Her project is focused on applying synthetic biology to parse the transcriptional networks underlying the acquisition of cell fate in plant roots.

Kevin Turner
Effects of fish predation on benthic communities in the San Juan Archipelago  Sebens Lab | October 21
Up Next: Kevin headed across the mountains to Pullman, where his wife is attending vet school. His 2 year old son keeps him very busy as he pursues teaching opportunities and tries to get used to living in a world without a next-door ocean.
Website: www.trophicecology.com






Laura Newcomb
Elevated temperature and ocean acidification alter mechanics of mussel attachment Carrington Lab | December 10
Up Next: Laura is a now Sea Gr…

Grad Publication: Mo Turner on Sea Star Wasting

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Pictures of disintegrating sea stars from the west coast have made national news over the past few years. UW Biograd Mo Turner (Ruesink Lab) was on one of the teams studying the phenomenon working out of Friday Harbor during the summer of 2014. The work she did with her team that summer has just appeared in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B (link). Way to go, Mo!
The summer of 2014 was simultaneously one of the most interesting, fast-paced, yet most tragic research projects that I’ve had the pleasure to experience. Simply put, I studied the ecology of a disease, and fell in love with the host.
The outbreak of Sea Star Wasting Disease (SSWD) was first reported in early 2013, with high sea star mortality occurring both intertidally and subtidally across the coasts of California, Oregon and Washington. In a somewhat baffling manner, the disease spread rapidly along the west coast, spanning a wide range of temperatures and affecting more than 20 species of sea stars and ki…